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This topic contains 15 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Frosty 11 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #148

    Anonymous

    Hi Frosty,I have just started snowboarding and i'm beggining to improve dramatically but....I still can't go down the hill heel side. Everytime I try going on my heel side I end up on my butt.I even have to flip my board over to the toe side when I wipe out just to get up.How can I correct this?

    #2590

    Frosty
    Coolest

    Sure bro, we can get you going on the heelside.  Can you provide a little more detail as to what you gather happens that causes you to fall on your butt?  Also, what kind of gear (board, boots, bindings) are you using?

    #2591

    Anonymous

    Sure bro, we can get you going on the heelside.  Can you provide a little more detail as to what you gather happens that causes you to fall on your butt?  Also, what kind of gear (board, boots, bindings) are you using?

    I have a GNU Carbon High Beam Series Snowboard, 24/7 V3 Bindings and a pair of Fresh snowboard boots. Whenever I try to slow myself down or go too fast heelside I fall. I guess it's just a balance issue. When im heelside is there any particular place where you are supposed to apply your weight to stay balanced better?

    #2592

    Frosty
    Coolest

    For riding the heelside you want to keep your knees slightly bent, weight centered, and balanced over the heelside edge.  If you do exactly that and you find that the edge slips out from underneath you and you fall on your butt, it could be an equipment issue.  Check to make sure that both of your bindings have forward lean set.  I think the average should be about 12 degrees of forward lean, give or take a couple.  In other words, if you look at your bindings and see that the highback is at a 90 degree angle to the baseplate, then you have 0 degrees of forward lean.  That is bad and will cause lots of butt-flops. There should be a highback forward lean adjuster on your bindings.  Some require a tool (such as a screwdriver) and some do not.  Adjust that so you have some forward lean.  This will allow you to work the heel edge into the snow surface while keeping your knees flexed slightly.  It will also keep the edge of the board under you and help keep it from slipping out!2_31_12_07_11_18_07.gifNotice that the measurement is the degrees of variance FROM THE RIGHT ANGLE (90 degrees).

    #2593

    Josh
    Participant

    (also)Try using your front  foot to initiate the turn (give it some flex) and don't lean too far.  If all you do is lean back with your upper body you will fall.imoo

    #2594

    mtnplummeter
    Participant

    Even though I am still a beginner (first season), what helped me the most so far was to lower my center of gravity.  Bend my knees a bit more, almost to what felt exaggerated.  And I was able to carve immediately. That helped me so much that my next time on the mountain I was able to handle the Blue runs, at least until I hit the moguls at the base, that was embarrassing luckily it was night ski.  I still have trouble going from Heel side to Toe side at high speeds, but no problems going Toe to Heel.  I suppose that will come.  Hope that helps.

    #2595

    Frosty
    Coolest

    Welcome to the forums mtnplummeter and thanks for the great advice!

    #2601

    mtnplummeter
    Participant

    Just posting here instead of a new topic because I am a new snowboarder.I was at Echo Mtn this weekend, which is a pretty cool terrain park.  My friends were trying to get me to go off some rails, boxes and ramps.  But on top of being too scared (only been riding for two months, and this was my 7th trip out ever), I am not sure that my board can handle freestyle moves.  I have the K2 Viper, which compared to my buddies boards is really stiff.  I don't know if having a softer board will be better.  I also was told/read that lighter more flexible bindings are preferred for freestyle riding.  On my K2 I have a pair of Burton Missions, but have also came upon a pair of Burton Freestyles which are considerable lighter and more flexible.  And I have my eye on a NS board for next season, which is a freestyle board. Would waiting until I have a more flexible board with lighter bindings be smart before I start attempting any airborne manuevers? I really don't want to mess up my current setup because I have been told and have experienced that this board is killer in powder and would like to keep it as such.  Thanks.

    #2602

    Frosty
    Coolest

    Good question man…  REALLY good.  OK, here's the scoop.  What your friends say is true to a certain degree and only to a certain degree.  Let's say 10% of doing freestyle is the specific gear you have.  MOST of it is your own skills and level of confidence you have.  Do not transfer responsibility to your gear.  Seems like you have really nice stuff.  I have been riding for over 17 years and rails always frighten me.  If I am really ON a certain day i might do them, but if any seed of doubt exists in my style I pass em up.  If some jerk wants to criticize me for it then forget him, I stay healthy enough to ride another day.  Doing rails WILL screw up your board after some time and you will most likely get really hurt when wrecking on one of them.  That's just the way it is.  Use your head and go for what you know.  Gear is only a small fraction of doing freestyle.

    #2603

    mtnplummeter
    Participant

    Thanks, I definitely think that I will wait till I get different equipment.  I agree that it is definitely the indian and not the arrow, but on top of a slightly more appropriate set up, if I wreck my gear I will at least have a back up to ride again, if I am not too messed up in the wreck.  Plus it will give me the rest of this season to work on my basic riding skills before trying anything stupid.  Thanks!

    #2630

    Travis Hightower
    Participant

    im one of the people that agrees with having a set up dedicated for boxes, rails, etc.i ride the terrain park with a forum manual thats shorter and has more flex than myall mountain board. the flex of the manual is a 3, i can bend it to great degree with myarms. it borders on the "wet noodle" definition of a jiblet. also it has a p-tex base thati can repair on the mountain if i have to. but i also agree that its the riders ability andnot the equipment. a good way to learn rail tricks flat land is on a balance board. a great way to get one of thoseis to either buy a skateboard deck, or hopefully you have one laying around in the garagesomewhere. take the trucks off and place the board on a 2 liter bottle of soda. its bestto take the soda out though and replace it with water, just incase it explodes.standing on the board balanced with tip and tail off the ground directly in the middle ofthe soda bottle will help you find your balance point for boardslides. heelside carves still are hard for me after 12 years of riding. some things just dont come toyou. i can make easy heelside turns but nothing as far as a hard carve. i just slide. i gotsick of wasting money taking lessons from people and decided to figure out my own wayaround it and worked hard on 180 flat spins. but i have alot of quirks about riding. frontsideairs and spins are really really hard for me...the most i can do frontside is a 3. backsidesare completely natural to me, the season on the east coast started late and im already backto b/s 5's and plan on starting to learn b/s 7's by the end of the season.i guess what im trying to say with that paragraph is, if things refuse to come to you, figure outa way around them. just concentrate on having fun. thats what this sport is all about 🙂

    #2631

    Frosty
    Coolest

    Awesome advise Travz.  I will have to try the 2-liter bottle balance thing!

    #2636

    Travis Hightower
    Participant

    Best thing I've ever found on the internet Frosty!  :mrgreen:I can send pictures if you need to see the setup.

    #2637

    Frosty
    Coolest

    Best thing I've ever found on the internet Frosty!  :mrgreen:I can send pictures if you need to see the setup.

    Sure, post some of the pics to the Gallery.

    #2723

    ILFlatlander
    Participant

    OK, I'm ready to take some heat for this suggestion, but try using ski poles the first few times out.  You may look a little goofy (at my age, who cares), but you'll spend a lot less time sitting on the ground nursing sore body parts.  The poles will also:1.  make stepping into your back binding much easier (no sitting required);2.  make getting up easier when you do fall; and3.  allow you to keep upright when you catch a toe or heel while going slow!For skiers, the transition to life as a boarder will be much easier with two old friends (poles!) by your sides.  Poles will also help newbies without ski experience to avoid much pain after the first day out.  It's your call, poles or pain? Poles will make your first few attempts at snowboarding alot less painful and more fun.  Give it a try!

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